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Scherzer to MLB Network: No talks on contract extension

Max Scherzer made an appearance on MLB Network’s Hot Stove morning program and talked on a wide range of topics, from new manager Brad Ausmus to what went awry in the playoffs. He said Ausmus called him earlier this week and introduced himself and he was impressed.

“He called me up the other day and I talked with him for a bit,” Scherzer said. “I think we made a great hire. For him, his pedigree speaks volumes. He caught in the big leagues for 18 years. I think with his knowledge of the game, he’s going to be able to fit right in for us and take us where we need to go.”

Whether Scherzer actually makes a start for him, of course, remains to be seen.

Scherzer is staying out of speculation over a potential trade, saying that’s part of the business. But he also said that there are no talks going on about a contract extension, at least to his knowledge.

“We really haven’t had too much talk previously about an extension,” Scherzer said. “Taking care of one this offseason, really I haven’t even approached it. I haven’t even stepped back and thought about it, just because we’re not at the right time to discuss a contract. I’m sure something can be talked about throughout the winter.”

Scherzer’s agent, Scott Boras, said earlier this fall that he anticipated talking with the Tigers about a potential extension this offseason. Boras has a well-earned reputation for believing players, especially pitchers, should test the free-agent market when they get close to free agency, a factor that played into the trade that brought Scherzer to the Tigers four years ago (Detroit strongly believed Edwin Jackson was going to test the market in a couple years). That said, Boras pitchers have signed extensions ahead of free agency, Jered Weaver being a notable example.

Fitting a potential Scherzer extension into payroll is another matter, which is why it wasn’t lost on reporters have team president/general manager Dave Dombrowski said unprompted that they have a surplus of starting pitchers.

“We have some pieces we need to fit together. I mean, we do have six starters at this point,” Dombrowski said Sunday. “People are aware of that, with [Drew] Smyly being available to start.”

Ken Rosenthal, part of the Hot Stove show, said earlier in the show that the Nationals are looking for an elite starting pitcher and could be a good fit for a deal, because of their depth in young power pitchers and their strong relationship with Boras (gee, that sounds familiar).

Scherzer tried to downplay the speculation.

“It doesn’t bother me,” he said. “I understand the business of the game and the reality of the payroll. And so, I mean, I get it. But at the same time, for me, I want to be a Detroit Tiger. I’ve been in Detroit for four years and we’ve had a great run. With all the friends that you have on the team, you just want that to continue, so hopefully it can.”

Jason Beck

Tigers might not be finished dealing yet

The Tigers filled a huge void in right-handed relief with Astros closer Jose Veras, a move that paid dividends Tuesday night. They prepared for the possibility of a Jhonny Peralta suspension by trading for slick-fielding Jose Iglesias. And they still might not be done yet.

The buzz among teams Wednesday continued to include the Tigers checking on more relief help. They’ve been pursuing lefty relief options in recent days, including San Francisco’s Javier Lopez, and there are plenty of other southpaws potentially available. They could also add a right-hander for relief depth, though not necessarily a big-name setup reliever like they’ve been pursuing the last few weeks.

Danny Knobler of CBSSports.com reported Wednesday that the Tigers had been in touch with the Blue Jays on relievers. Toronto has veteran lefty Darren Oliver, who turns 43 this October, as well as All-Star setup lefty Brett Cecil and right-hander Steve Delabar.

Team president/general manager Dombrowski indicated late Tuesday night after the Iglesias deal that he was not expecting anything, but didn’t rule out pursuing another swap. The big question Dombrowski posed Sunday was whether the lofty demands teams had for relief pitching going into the week would drop at the deadline. If someone’s price drops, the Tigers could well make another move.

Jason Beck

Dombrowski: We’re not looking for a bat

Not even a shortstop, it appears.

As reports pick up about potential suspensions Major League Baseball has planned for players involved in the Biogenesis investigation, Tigers president/general manager Dave Dombrowski is avoiding comment, saying Tuesday that it’s a Major League Baseball matter. Even a question about whether the team has made contingency plans in the event of a suspension was a question Dombrowski didn’t want to touch.

When asked about what depth the Tigers might have in the middle infield if they needed a shortstop in a pinch, Dombrowski listed his internal options.

“We have depth in the infield,” Dombrowski said. “Argenis Diaz is an outstanding defensive shortstop. He can really pick the ball at short. [Danny] Worth is playing second base; we know he can play shortstop. [Ramon] Santiago can go over there and play.

“You’re not going to get the offense from any of them that you would get [from Peralta] on a regular basis. So we have some depth in that regard.”

Both Diaz and Worth have spent the season at Triple-A Toledo. Worth has spent several stints in Detroit as a reserve, while Diaz has been in Toledo since 2011.

The option not listed there was Hernan Perez, the rookie who has filled in at second base the last couple weeks with Omar Infante on the disabled list. Perez has played nearly as many minor-league games at shortstop as he has at second base, including 27 at Erie this season before fellow prospect Eugenio Suarez was promoted.

“Can Perez go over there? That’s a good question that I don’t really know the answer,” Dombrowski said. “He’s played primarily second base this year. He’s played shortstop in the past. We switched him over to second. I think he’s going to be an outstanding defensive second baseman, all-around second baseman.

“Is he a shortstop for the future? I don’t really know that answer. Could he be? Maybe.”

At this point, internal options are the only options the Tigers have. As Wednesday afternoon’s nonwaiver Trade Deadline approaches, Dombrowski all but ruled out a trade for a fill-in. The Tigers are not pursuing a deal for a position player of any kind, it appears.

“We’re not looking for a bat,” Dombrowski said. “Again, if somebody drops something on your lap that you’re not anticipating being there, which happens sometimes in the last 24 hours … you never can tell what happens. But we’re not aggressively seeking that.”

They’re not looking for a bat. They already have a glove.

Jason Beck

What’s next for Tigers after Veras

Though Tigers president/general manager Dave Dombrowski told Joel Sherman of the New York Post that Jose Veras would likely be his team’s lone move before the July 31 nonwaiver Trade Deadline, that doesn’t mean Dombrowski isn’t going to try for something else. The next goal appears to be another left-handed reliever to slot with Drew Smyly.

Danny Knobler of CBSSports.com reported late Monday night that the Tigers are among the many teams in the mix for Giants lefty Javier Lopez. The Giants have been scouting pitchers at Double-A Erie, including right-handed starter Drew VerHagen, according to a source.

There’s also buzz among other clubs that the Tigers could make a run at one more right-handed reliever for depth. Phil Rogers of the Chicago Tribune reported Detroit is in the mix for Cubs closer Kevin Gregg. However, there’s a recent history of misguided rumors regarding Tigers interest in Cubs players (Carlos Marmol, Matt Garza, Alfonso Soriano among them) which, along with Gregg’s recent struggles and his 4.27 career ERA and 1.44 career WHIP in the American League (well above his NL numbers) bring the level of interest into question.

The Tigers might be able to fill a right-handed relief spot internally. Octavio Dotel has resumed throwing side sessions in Lakeland in his attempt to come back from elbow inflammation. Meanwhile, Jeremy Bonderman threw two perfect innings of relief at Triple-A Toledo on Monday, stretching his streak to seven scoreless innings on one hit in the Mud Hens bullpen.

Though other teams continue to wait for the Tigers to try to add a shortstop in anticipation of a possible Jhonny Peralta suspension, they’ve no shown sign of heavy pursuit, even with the reported availability of Angels shortstop Erick Aybar and rumors the Giants might listen to interest on veteran middle infielder Marco Scutaro. Two thoughts could be in play: First, if Peralta were to appeal any suspension, it could well push back any discipline until next year. Second, if Peralta received a suspension that would allow him to return in time for the postseason, the Tigers would have to debate just how much production they need out of shortstop to win the AL Central.

Jason Beck

Other than those two areas, the Tigers are pretty well set.

Tigers appear more likely for setup help

The Tigers continue to search the market for relievers, and they continue to scout potential trading partners. This weekend, they have scouts watching the Marlins, Brewers, Padres, Mariners and Astros, according to CBSSports.com’s Danny Knobler.

The wide scouting search isn’t unusual for the Tigers, who leverage the strength of their Major League scouting department this time of year.

The longer the search goes on, however, the more likely it appears they’ll look for setup and middle relief help rather than any major deal for a veteran closer.

The Tigers were told recently that the Marlins have no intention of trading closer Steve Cishek, who’s under team control for another four years and doesn’t become eligible for arbitration until this winter. MLB.com’s Joe Frisaro has reported that the Marlins could deal him if they were overwhelmed by an offer, such as a package including a top prospect such as Nick Castellanos. But while the Tigers don’t declare any player untouchable, it’s unlikely they’ll deal Castellanos for a closer.

Detroit still views Bruce Rondon as the long-term answer at closer, and his recent success in seventh- and eighth-inning opportunities has helped give that some momentum. More important for now, Joaquin Benoit’s success in save situations has stabilized the closer role in the short term, and arguably provided the Tigers with the bridge they needed.

With the Phillies seemingly intending to hold onto Jonathan Papelbon (or at least not unload him in a salary dump) and Cubs closer Kevin Gregg not looking appealing as an option (his career numbers in the American League are much worse than the National League, and the Tigers have passed on him before), the path to a stable bullpen appears more likely to come from filling in behind Benoit with setup help than filling the top spot. Seattle and Milwaukee, though, have relievers with closing experience.

– Jason Beck

Dombrowski on closer: “Our outlook has not changed”

Does this sound like a familiar scenario: The Tigers say they’re set at a particular position, one where prominent agent Scott Boras has a well-known free agent looking for a market. Boras bypasses team president/general manager Dave Dombrowski and talks with owner Mike Ilitch. The Tigers abruptly change course and get involved.

It happened three winters ago with Johnny Damon. Could it be happening right now with Rafael Soriano? With Tuesday’s report from MLB Network’s Peter Gammons that Boras talked with Ilitch about Soriano on Monday, you have to wonder.

Here’s the report from Gammons on MLB Network’s Hot Stove show this morning:

The Tigers have maintained that they’d like to give hard-throwing rookie Bruce Rondon a chance to win the closer’s job, though Dombrowski said they could still take a look at the market later and could add somebody under the right scenario.

Dombrowski reaffirmed that approach when reached Tuesday.

“Our outlook has not changed,” Dombrowski replied in an email.

In fairness, the Tigers initially downplayed the rumors about Damon a few years ago, only to reach a deal six weeks later. So eventually, maybe they’ll do the same with Soriano. If it happens, though, it doesn’t sound like it’s imminent. With the notable exception of Prince Fielder, no Boras deal ever seems to be quick.

All along, the expectation was that Boras would try to get the Tigers — and especially Ilitch — involved on Soriano. The question has always been whether Ilitch would listen. Bill Madden of the New York Daily News reported a couple weeks ago that it already happened, and that Ilitch said no. Others have reported that it hadn’t happened yet but they expected it to come. ESPN’s Buster Olney cited executives from other teams expecting it to happen.

That doesn’t mean Soriano will get the kind of massive deal that he wants, one that torpedoes the Tigers’ long-term plans for Rondon. Time will tell if there’s a compromise to be found somewhere in there.

– Jason Beck

Tigers reach two-year deal with Torii Hunter

That didn’t take long. A day after Torii Hunter visited Detroit, the free-agent outfielder and the Tigers reached an agreement on a two-year contract, pending a physical. Sources confirmed the deal, first reported by Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com.

Hunter left Detroit Tuesday night and reportedly did not have an offer. The deal came together quickly Wednesday morning.

Hunter not only fills the corner outfield spot that stood as the lone void in the Tigers lineup, he provides Detroit with the right-handed bat it conspicuously lacked throughout the 2012 season in its struggles against left-handed pitching.

Add in Hunter’s proven tablesetting abilities in the second spot — he goes from batting between Mike Trout and Albert Pujols to slotting between Austin Jackson and Miguel Cabrera — along with his smart baserunning and still-standout defense, and there’s plenty to like for the Tigers in the deal.

While Hunter gets a multi-year contract that will take him just shy of his 40th birthday, the Tigers get the future flexibility to mix top prospects Avisail Garcia and Nick Castellanos into their outfield. Garcia was a postseason hero for Detroit at age 21, while Castellanos knocked on the door of a September call-up at age 20.

Both could benefit greatly from working with Hunter, whose impact was credited by AL Rookie of the Year and MVP candidate Mike Trout for helping him adjust so quickly to the big leagues with the Angels.

Jason Beck

Source: Tigers meeting with Torii Hunter in Detroit

Torii Hunter has been to Comerica Park and downtown Detroit several times as a visiting player. On Tuesday, he took a visit as a free agent, meeting with members of the Tigers front office as Detroit took its courtship to an in-person level.

A source confirmed what is being characterized as a meet-and-greet visit, first reported by FOXSports.com. The Tigers have an organizational policy of not commenting on free agents.

It is not necessarily a sign of an imminent deal for Hunter, who is weighing a visit with at least one other club and isn’t believed to have an offer from the Tigers yet. Nevertheless, it’s a sign that the courtship has grown serious. It also reinforces Hunter’s prediction on MLB Network Monday that his free-agent recruitment wouldn’t be drawn-out.

Hunter has played in Detroit on the visiting side for years, so long that he played at Tiger Stadium as a rookie for the Minnesota Twins in 1999. Tuesday’s visit allowed him a chance to meet with team officials in a different setting and get an idea about Hunter’s potential fit on the team.

Jason Beck

Tigers emerge as suitor (front-runner?) for Torii Hunter

Torii Hunter’s play as a Minnesota Twins outfielder early in his career earned him the title as a Tiger killer around these parts. After all these years, it’s now realistic for Detroit fans to consider the possibility of Hunter becoming a Tiger.

It might not take long to figure out, one way or the other.

The Tigers are interested in Hunter, as reported earlier Monday by CBSSports.com’s Danny Knobler, and as has been expected since team president/general manager Dave Dombrowski laid out their needs for a corner outfielder two weeks ago. Between Detroit’s season-long struggles against left-handed pitching, its desire to become more athletic, its lack of a proven second hitter between Austin Jackson and Miguel Cabrera, and Delmon Young’s departure as a free agent taking away one of Detroit’s key right-handed hitters, the Tigers’ needs fit Hunter’s strengths.

Just as encouraging, there are signs the interest is mutual, and strong. Whether the Tigers should be considered the front-runners for Hunter, as MLB Network Radio’s Jim Bowden and others put it, is a matter of perception, one that could change if another of his suitors (Knobler mentioned Texas, while the Rays, Phillies and Red Sox have also been mentioned in reports for possible one-year offers) steps up in the coming days. But signs point towards a logical match between Hunter and Detroit.

Hunter sounded Monday morning like he already has a team or teams in mind, and could sign soon, maybe by Thanksgiving — the day he signed his five-year deal with the Angels in 2007.

“It’s going to be quick,” Hunter told MLB Network’s Hot Stove morning show with Harold Reynolds. “I’m not going to wait it out. I know who I want to play for.”

Hunter didn’t mention which teams, but he said he’s looking to win, not simply get paid.

“Everybody knows I want to win,” Hunter told MLB Network, “so whatever team’s out there that wants to win and can use me and let me be a part of it, that’s who I want to be playing with.”

Hunter’s five-year deal with the Angels earned him $90 million. He has plenty of money, and he has a son who just committed to a football scholarship at Notre Dame.

That said, it’s expected to take a multi-year deal to sign Hunter, a fact which impacts his market at age 37. If he were to settle on a one-year deal, his field expands.

It leaves the Tigers with an intriguing decision. Detroit has two highly regarded, right-handed hitting outfield prospects with postseason hero Avisail Garcia and Futures Game MVP Nick Castellanos. Both are expected to have a chance to compete for a job in Spring Training, possibly a timeshare with Andy Dirks or Brennan Boesch in one corner outfield spot.

The other corner spot is open, and that’s where Hunter fits in. Add in Hunter’s clubhouse presence and track record of working with young outfielders — Mike Trout credited Hunter’s help as an impact on him during his Rookie of the Year interview Monday night on MLB Network — and he’s one potential signing that could improve two spots, not to mention his potential impact on center fielder Austin Jackson.

However, a two-year deal for Hunter likely would mean a longer wait for Castellanos or Garcia. It wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world, an extra year or two of development, but it’s something the win-now Tigers have to weigh.

– Jason Beck

Bonderman still watching market for comeback

If the Tigers have offered a formal contract to Jeremy Bonderman, it seems to be a new development to him. He told MLB.com in a phone conversation Friday that he has left contract matters to his agent.

“I’m just seeing what all is out there right now,” Bonderman said. “But I have talked to Detroit.”

FOXSports.com’s Jon Paul Morosi cited sources Friday saying the Tigers have offered Bonderman a contract. It wouldn’t be a complete surprise if they did. When Bonderman became a free agent two offseasons ago, president/GM Dave Dombrowski had a standing offer on the table for a Minor League contract with a Spring Training invite. Bonderman was looking for a Major League contract at that time, and ended up simply staying home.

Bonderman admitted this past spring that he blew out his elbow while working out that offseason. He underwent Tommy John surgery this spring and has worked out ever since then in preparation for a comeback attempt. He said Friday he’s on schedule to be ready for full workouts come Spring Training.

He’s willing to accept a minor-league deal with a camp invite now, which could pave the way for a reunion with the Tigers. At this point however, it would make sense for him to watch the market and see what develops. If he can find a team with a rotation opening, it would give him a better shot at making the team than he might have in Detroit, where the Tigers already have enough established starters to fill out a rotation regardless whether they re-sign Anibal Sanchez.

Team president/general manager Dave Dombrowski said in an email Friday that he can’t comment on specific free agents, citing current Major League rules.

Dombrowski said last week that the Tigers could look for a starter to compete for the fifth spot if they don’t re-sign Sanchez. Most likely, though, that signing would be an insurance option in case Drew Smyly struggles or somebody gets hurt. The Tigers don’t have the same starter depth in the upper levels of their farm system that they had the past couple years, having traded Jacob Turner and watched Andy Oliver struggle mightily this past season. Duane Below and Adam Wilk are among the depth options they have right now.

Bonderman hasn’t pitched anywhere since 2010. Up to this point, he has spent his entire Major League career in Detroit since he crashed the Tigers rotation at age 20 in 2003. He turned 30 years old just two weeks ago.

– Jason Beck

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