Results tagged ‘ Royals ’

Melky Cabrera heading back to Kansas City?

Melky Cabrera is one of the top free-agent outfielders available, so it’s no surprise a number of teams are interested in the former All-Star.

The Royals have been in contact with Cabrera, while the Reds, Mariners, Orioles, White Sox and Blue Jays are also in the mix, according to a report from CBSSports.com.

Cabrera, 30, could help a number of teams offensively. He’s coming off a strong season with Toronto in which he posted a .301/.351/.458 slash line with 16 home runs, 35 doubles and 73 RBIS over 139 games.

The Royals are in need of a bat after the departure of designated hitter Billy Butler in free agency. The club is familiar with Cabrera too, as he spent the 2011 season with Kansas City.

Cabrera is reportedly looking for at least a five-year contract. He could be in line for a deal similar to fellow outfielder Nelson Cruz, who signed with the Mariners this week for four years and $57 million. Cabrera earned $8 million this season.

The Blue Jays could still bring Cabrera back, though. Toronto appears to be all-in this season after signing free-agent catcher Russell Martin and trading for third baseman Josh Donaldson. The club has holes to fill in the outfield after deciding to non-tender John Mayberry Jr. and Andy Dirks on Tuesday.

With the Winter Meetings set to begin next week in San Diego, the market for Cabrera could soon become more clear.

–Austin Laymance

Royals sign Frasor, trade Crow to Marlins

The Royals completed a pair of transactions involving their bullpen on Friday.

Kansas City signed right-hander Jason Frasor to a one-year contract for 2015 with a mutual option for 2016. Hours later, the Royals dealt right-hander Aaron Crow to the Marlins in exchange for Minor League pitchers Brian Flynn and Reid Redman.

Frasor’s deal is worth $1.25 million with a potential $500,000 in performance bonuses for next year, reports MLB.com’s Dick Kaegel. The mutual option for ’16 is for $2 million plus $500,000 in performance bonuses, with a $550,000 buyout. All told, Frasor is guaranteed at least $1.8 million.

Frasor, 37, became an important piece in the bullpen after being acquired from the Rangers in a July trade. He pitched well for Kansas City down the stretch, going 3-0- with a 1.53 ERA. Frasor followed that up with a strong postseason, posting a 1.69 ERA and earning victories in the American League Wild Card game against the A’s and Game 3 of the AL Championship Series against the Orioles.

Frasor’s emergence prompted the Royals to leave Crow off the postseason roster, and now Crow has found a new team with the Marlins.

Crow, 28, was 6-1 with a 4.12 ERA and three saves over 67 relief appearances with the Royals in 2014. He was drafted and developed by Kansas City and was an All-Star in his rookie season of 2011. Since then, his 20 wins are tied for the second-most among AL relievers.

–Austin Laymance

Orioles in the mix for Billy Butler?

The defending American League champion Royals would like to retain designated hitter Billy Butler, despite turning down his $12 million club option.

However, sources say, Butler has received a 3-year, $30 million offer from a team widely believed to be the Orioles. If that’s the case, the Royals will pursue other options including the possibility of not having a dedicated DH and regulars through that spot to give them a little bit of a break.

–Paul Hagen

Disclaimer: No indication Rockies owner can be swayed into dealing Tulo … Still, team has to be prepared if talks occur

We preface everything here with the simple statement, based on conversations with sources inside and outside the Rockies organization:

Owner Dick Monfort has no interest in trading shortstop Troy Tulowitzki at Thursday afternoon’s non-waiver Trade Deadline. The belief that a healthy Rockies club, with an improved rotation and a bullpen overhaul, is a winner next season means odds are against Monfort moving Tulowitzki — signed for extreme riches through 2020 — this offseason.

But the way to not get caught off guard is to be prepared, even if you know nothing may happen.

In the days leading to the Trade Deadline, the Rockies are getting ready for the magic phone call, even if it’s not coming.

The Rockies spent much of Monday studying the Mets organization, looking at current Major Leaguers and prospects, and gauging the abilities of young pitchers who have not reached their arbitration years. Any Mets pitcher who is anyone, whether he is working in Queens – like National League Rookie of the Year candidate Jacob deGrom – or prospects such as righty Noah Syndergaard (No. 1 on the MLB.com Mets Top 20 Prospects list) or Rafael Montero (No. 6), the Rockies are prepared to discuss. If the names of numerous position players come up, the Rockies are prepared.

But here’s the thing. Mets general manager Sandy Alderson on Monday said it is “unlikely” the team will make any deal, and sources throughout the game are saying it’s unlikely anything serious will occur with the Rockies. And, as can’t be stated enough, it’s all fantasy unless Monfort changes his belief that the Rockies will win with Tulowitzki.

But that’s the way these things work. Oh, it’s not only the Mets. We hear the Rockies have beefed up their knowledge on the Cardinals and the Angels – two teams with the money and Major League-ready players to make the Rockies’ baseball people at least listen if they were to call – and a few other teams that may have interest. Speaking of which, since Tulowitzki’s showing up at Yankee Stadium Sunday sparked so many conspiracy theories, we are told the Yankees are not one of the teams that the Rockies believe have players it takes to pull off a Tulowizki deal.

There’s absolutely no indication either team will make that call before the deadline. Nonetheless, the Rockies want to have detailed information if talks ever begin.

Other fronts appear to be quiet, although there is interest.

• We identified the Pirates as a team that is taking a look at Rockies closer LaTroy Hawkins, and now we’re told that 5-6 clubs are interested in Hawkins, knowing he can pitch in any situation. But two issues are making it hard to deal the 41-year-old reliever with the ageless right arm:

The Rockies believe his influence is strong enough on young players and young pitchers that they want to keep him around, even though the team is in last place.

The Rockies’ requirement for help at the start of next season, plus pitchers under club control applies to Hawkins. Teams in contention haven’t offered what the Rockies want.

• It’s doubtful the Rockies will move lefty Jorge De La Rosa, who has pitched better at Coors than any pitcher in their history. The Rockies have been listening when clubs inquire, but after it surfaced that the Rockies coveted Orioles righty Kevin Gausman and a whole haul of prospects, no other team’s interest made it to the rumor stage. Expect the Rockies to make the $14 million qualifying offer to De La Rosa, a free agent after this season, and use that as the basis for keeping him.

• While the Rockies have scouted lefty Brett Anderson since his return from a broken left index finger, but there are no active discussions. The Rockies are expected to pick up Anderson’s $12 million option for next season.

– Thomas Harding

2/7 Roundup

And then there were three. With free-agent right-hander Bronson Arroyo agreeing Friday to a two-year deal with the D-backs that includes a club option, the remaining big-name starters on the market are A.J. Burnett, Ervin Santana and Ubaldo Jimenez.

Like Arroyo, whichever club signs Burnett will not lose a first round pick in this year’s First-Year Player Draft. Santana and Jimenez, on the other hand, don’t fall into that category. So where will Burnett land?

The Pirates could have the inside track, writes MLB.com’s Tom Singer, but the Orioles and Nationals are also in the running. Burnett and his camp have kept their thought process secret thus far, but with Spring Training on the horizon, something is likely to happen soon.

The Phillies appear to be out of the Burnett sweepstakes, and will instead turn their attention to former closer Ryan Madson, who has not pitched since 2011 because of Tommy John surgery and complications following the procedure.

In other Hot Stove news:

• Nelson Cruz remains on the market, and MLB.com’s Mike Bauman examined the potential risks and rewards for clubs looking to sign the outfielder. Cruz would significantly boost any lineup, however, the slugger has a history of injury, will turn 34 in July and served a 50-game PED suspension last year.

• Meanwhile, the A’s locked up outfielder Coco Crisp through at least 2016 with a two-year contract extension that includes a vesting option for 2017. Last year, Crisp became just the 10th player in Oakland history with at least 20 doubles and 20 home runs in a single season.

• The Brewers brought back reliever Francisco Rodriguez, this time on a one-year deal worth at least $3.25 million. In a corresponding roster move, pitcher Donovan Hand was designated for assignment.

• The White Sox also added to their bullpen mix, signing right-hander Mitchell Boggs to a one-year, $1.1 million contract.

• Outfielder Jimmy Paredes was designated for assignment by the Marlins to open a roster spot for infielder Jeff Baker, who agreed to a two-year deal this week.

• The Nationals agreed to terms with veteran reliever Luis Ayala on a Minor League contract with an invitation to Major League Spring Training. Ayala, 36, is one of the few remaining players to have appeared with the Expos.

• The Pirates inked catcher Omir Santos to a Minor League deal that includes an invitation to big league camp.

• First baseman Matt LaPorta and the Orioles agreed to a Minor League contract. LaPorta has not appeared in a Major League game since 2012, when he played 22 games with the Indians.

• Royals pitcher Everett Teaford cleared waivers and remained in the organization with an assignment to Triple-A Omaha. The left-hander has been invited to Major League Spring Training.

-Austin Laymance

2/1 Roundup

With pitchers and catchers scheduled to report to Spring Training in less than two weeks, time is running out for free-agent starters A.J. Burnett, Ervin Santana, Ubaldo Jimenez and Bronson Arroyo to find work. However, the Orioles are rumored to be in talks with those big-name arms, writes MLB.com’s Brittany Ghiroli.

Baltimore executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette said Saturday his club has “some more work to do this offseason.” In addition to talking to several free-agent starters, Duquette and the Orioles would also like to avoid an arbitration hearing with catcher Matt Wieters. For his part, Wieters said he’s staying out of the contract negotiations.

Perhaps once Burnett, Santana, Jimenez or Arroyo reaches a deal with a club, the rest will follow suit. Although that quartet remains on the market, there was still movement on the Hot Stove on Saturday:

• The Nationals and right-handed starter Doug Fister agreed to a one-year deal, avoiding arbitration. With Fister under contract for 2014, reliever Tyler Clippard is the only player expected to take Washington to arbitration this month. Clippard seeks $6.35 million, while the Nationals have offered $4.45 million.

• In a similar development, the Dodgers and catcher A.J. Ellis avoided arbitration by coming to terms on a 2014 contract worth $3.55 million plus incentives. That leaves closer Kenley Jansen as the only remaining Dodgers player eligible for arbitration. Jansen is looking for $5.05 million and the club has offered $3.5 million.

• Veteran utility man Emilio Bonifacio was designated for assignment by the Royals in a move to clear roster space for left-handed starter Bruce Chen, who recently inked a new contract. Kansas City has 10 days to place Bonifacio on waivers, release him or trade him.

• Giants head of baseball operations Brian Sabean said the organization would still consider signing a veteran reliever, though “it would have to be at a minimal price.”

-Austin Laymance

1/30 Roundup

An already thin third-base market got a little slimmer on Thursday, with veteran Michael Young choosing to retire rather than pursue offers from a few teams. With Young off the market, Placido Polanco and Cody Ransom are the top third basemen available.

As MLB.com’s Richard Justice writes, Young was adored by teammates, coaches and fans over a 14-year Major League career. During his 13 seasons with the Rangers, Young not only established himself as the face of the franchise, he was a perennial Gold Glove candidate and an offensive threat.

Although Young’s retirement dominated the headlines on Thursday, the Hot Stove did see some more action:

* With Spring Training right around the corner, MLB.com’s Phil Rogers examined the remaining free agent crop and put together an interesting team of available players. A.J. Burnett, Ervin Santana, Bronson Arroyo, Ubaldo Jimenez and Tommy Hanson are among the top starting pitchers still on the market, not to mention Jason Hammel and Paul Maholm. Several talented relievers are also available, most notably closer Fernando Rodney.

As for position players, such big names as shortstop Stephen Drew, slugger Kendrys Morales and outfielder Nelson Cruz are all looking for work. The Hot Stove will surely heat up as these players move closer to signing deals.

* Meanwhile, left-hander Bruce Chen and the Royals are close to completing a one-year contract; Chen needs to undergo a physical before the deal becomes official.

Chen’s almost certain return to Kansas City’s rotation is likely to have an impact on Santana, who posted a 3.24 ERA with the Royals last year. MLB.com’s Dick Kaegel predicts Santana is “not likely to follow Chen back through the Royals clubhouse door.”

- Austin Laymance

1/29 Roundup

In a free-agent market light on shortstops, Stephen Drew would figure to be a hot commodity, coming off a year in which he played solid defense at the position and produced a .777 on-base-plus-slugging percentage for the Red Sox. Yet the 30-year-old seems to be running out of options, with Spring Training rapidly approaching.

On Tuesday night, Mets general manager Sandy Alderson told MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo that it is “unlikely” his club will sign Drew. On Wednesday, our Bryan Hoch reported that the Yankees are not considering bringing in Drew, while Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com and MLB Network wrote that the A’s also are not interested.

All of those factors could make a return to Boston more likely for Drew, who is tied to Draft pick compensation after receiving a qualifying offer.

In other news from around the league:

  • The Phillies could be a team to watch in the competition for veteran right-hander A.J. Burnett, a free agent who recently decided to pitch this season. Signing Burnett would be a great move for Philadelphia, one that just might get it back to the postseason, writes MLB.com columnist Richard Justice. Meanwhile, MLB.com’s Tom Singer offers an idea for how the Pirates could manage to bring back Burnett.
  • Bronson Arroyo told ESPN.com’s Jayson Stark that while 12 teams have contacted his agent this offseason, he has not come close to a deal with any of them. Arroyo and Burnett are drawing some interest from the Blue Jays, but Toronto appears more focused on fellow free-agent right-handers Ubaldo Jimenez and Ervin Santana, according to Rosenthal.
  • After a 15-year career that included six All-Star teams, a World Series title and 366 home runs, Lance Berkman told MLB.com that he has decided to retire. Berkman spent an injury-plagued 2013 with the Rangers.
  • Right-hander Scott Baker, who returned from Tommy John surgery at the end of last season, signed a Minor League deal with the Mariners and figures to compete for a spot in their starting rotation.
  • Former Phillies closer Ryan Madson, who has missed the past two seasons due to injury, held a private workout for an unknown team on Tuesday and is planning a public audition for more clubs on Feb.7 in Phoenix, according to Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com.
  • The Cardinals and infielder Daniel Descalso agreed to a one-year contract, avoiding arbitration, while the Cubs did the same with outfielder Justin Ruggiano.
  • The Reds bolstered their infield depth by signing veteran Ramon Santiago to a Minor League contract.
  • For the third time this offseason, the Twins signed a former member of the organization to a Minor League deal, this time bringing back reliever Matt Guerrier.
  • The Angels added Chad Tracy to the mix in their crowded competition for bench spots.
  • The Royals acquired outfielder Carlos Peguero from the Mariners for a player to be named later and designated left-hander Everett Teaford for assignment.

– Andrew Simon

1/21 Roundup

Masahiro Tanaka has captivated Hot Stove followers for much of the offseason, and now that the deadline for the Japanese free agent to choose a Major League team is fast approaching, Tanaka Watch is only intensifying. Several interested teams, including the D-backs, are waiting intently for his decision.

As MLB.com’s Doug Miller writes, Tuesday was another day with much speculation but little actual news, starting with an innocuous Tanaka tweet that quickly was misinterpreted.

Regardless of where Tanaka ends up, the long process will leave him with huge expectations and several disppointed suitors, as MLB.com columnist Phil Rogers writes. Tanaka also is a shining reminder of baseball’s international growth, according to columnist Mike Bauman.

In other news from around the league on Tuesday:

  • The Indians have not taken part in an arbitration hearing since 1991, but as MLB.com Indians beat writer Jordan Bastian reports, the longest streak in the Majors seems likely to end this year. The club and All-Star righty Justin Masterson exchanged salary figures that stand nearly $4 million apart, a gap that could be too wide to cross without a hearing. Bastian also reports that the two sides remain far apart on a possible contract extension, with Masterson set for free agency after this season.
  • Astros owner Jim Crane confirmed that his club, underdogs in the Tanaka sweepstakes, nonetheless has participated in the bidding.
  • The White Sox have a Tanaka-or-bust mentality when it comes to adding to their rotation, reports beat writer Scott Merkin, who doesn’t believe the club will explore other free-agent options, such as Matt Garza or Ubaldo Jimenez.
  • The Angels, on the other hand, have targeted Garza, as Alden Gonzalez writes in his latest inbox. Bronson Arroyo, Paul Maholm and Chris Capuano could be some of their other options as they try to bolster their rotation.
  • Reds beat writer Mark Sheldon addresses several issues in his inbox, including a potential signing of Grady Sizemore and the status of Homer Bailey.
  • The Phillies had a busy day, highlighted by signing Bobby Abreu to a Minor League deal. Abreu, a star with the club from 1998-2006, didn’t play in the Majors last season but parlayed a strong winter ball campaign in Venezuela into another chance. Philadelphia also avoided arbitration with lefty reliever Antonio Bastardo and signed veteran righty Chad Gaudin to a Minor League deal, getting a pitcher with the versatility to start or come out of the bullpen.
  • As part of this notebook, Rangers beat writer T.R. Sullivan reports that the Rangers are “cautiously optimistic” that starters Matt Harrison and Colby Lewis, both on the comeback trail from injuries, will be 100 percent for Spring Training. Lewis is one candidate for the No. 5 starter job, in a race that also includes second-year righty Nick Tepesch.
  • The Royals signed outfielder Justin Maxwell to a one-year contract, avoiding arbitration and leaving them with two unsigned arbitration-eligible players.

– Andrew Simon

1/17 Roundup

On a day when the Dodgers announced their seven-year, $215 million contract extension with ace left-hander Clayton Kershaw, numerous smaller deals were completed across the Major Leagues.

Friday was the deadline for teams to exchange salary figures with arbitration-eligible players, leading many to work out compromises, albeit none that carry the financial impact of Kershaw’s. For those who didn’t reach agreements, negotiations can continue until hearings take place from Feb. 1-21, at which point the decisions will be in the hands of three-judge arbitration panels.

Here is a look at some of Friday’s big arbitration-related news:

  • The Nationals signed five of their seven eligible players, including All-Star right-hander Jordan Zimmermann and shortstop Ian Desmond. Washington bought out the final two years of arbitration for both players, locking them up for $24 million and $17.5 million, respectively.
  • Reigning American League Cy Young Award winner Max Scherzer agreed to a $15.525 million contract with the Tigers, who still have a lot of work to do if they want to prevent him from reaching free agency next offseason.
  • Chris Davis headlined the Orioles’ five signings, getting a raise of roughly $7 million in his second year of arbitration after leading the Majors in home runs and RBIs. Catcher Matt Wieters, also two years from free agency, has yet to reach a deal.
  • Third baseman Chase Headley was among the players to settle with the Padres as he readies for his final season before free agency.
  • While the Braves were able to sign four arbitration-eligible players, they will have to exchange figures with closer Craig Kimbrel, first baseman Freddie Freeman and outfielder Jason Heyward.
  • The Marlins put a stop to all three of their arbitration cases, handing $6.5 million to slugger Giancarlo Stanton in the process. Stanton’s salary will jump from $537,000 in his first year of arbitration.
  • The Yankees also locked up all of their arbitration-eligible players, as outfielder Brett Gardner led the way with a $5.6 million settlement.
  • Another club set to sit out the hearings is Toronto, which rewarded center fielder Colby Rasmus’ strong 2013 with a $7 million deal in his final year of club control.
  • Royals first baseman Eric Hosmer, who bounced back in a big way after going through a rough ‘12, settled on a $3.6 million contract in his first year of arbitration.
  • Josh Reddick is the only A’s player who remains unsigned after the club came to agreements with four more players on Friday, including offseason acquisitions Craig Gentry and Luke Gregerson.
  • Pedro Alvarez and Neil Walker were among the players to come to terms with the Pirates, who closed all of their arbitration cases.
  • A day after settling with ace lefty David Price, the Rays avoided arbitration with each of their six remaining players, including righty Jeremy Hellickson.
  • The Reds have negotiating left to do with starter Homer Bailey and closer Aroldis Chapman and are hoping to ink Bailey to a long-term deal.

– Andrew Simon

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