Results tagged ‘ White Sox ’

Haren’s market leaning East

Former Angels starter Dan Haren, who was bought out of his 2013 option for $3.5 million, is drawing heavy interest from several teams, most of them residing in the East coast.

Haren’s most aggressive suitor thus far, according to a person with knowledge of his free agency: The Red Sox. The Nationals, Orioles, White Sox, Padres and Blue Jays are among other clubs that have expressed interest. Haren, however, is said to be in no hurry to sign, preferring to let a lot of the smoke clear before making his decision.

The Angels recently checked in on Haren, but nothing had changed from a negotiating standpoint. After trading for Tommy Hanson, only one spot is left in their rotation — and their desire to resign Zack Greinke remains. If Greinke’s price tag reaches $150 million, as has been reported, the Angels will go with a much cheaper free-agent starter and sign at least one more upper-tier reliever, joining Ryan Madson.

Haren, who wants to keep pitching in Southern California, could make sense given his price tag, track record and familiarity. For now, however, a return remains unlikely.

Haren is coming off his first rough season in quite a while, going 12-13 with a 4.33 ERA, a stint on the disabled list with lower back problems and a drop in velocity. From 2005-11, though, he was one of baseball’s most consistent starters, winning 101 games, posting a 3.49 ERA and averaging 226 innings per season.

The Angels also had the framework of a deal in place with the Cubs in early November, sending Haren to Chicago for closer Carlos Marmol. In it, an industry source said, the Cubs were slated to take on most of Haren’s salary and Marmol’s. But according to ESPN.com’s Buster Olney, the Cubs backed out due to concerns over Haren’s hip — not his back.

– Alden Gonzalez 

Williams still working to strengthen White Sox

When Ken Williams was asked during Sunday’s conference call as to whether more White Sox trades were possible before Tuesday’s 3 p.m. CT non-waiver deadline, the team’s general manager answered with one word.

“Yes,” Williams said.

That reply was followed by silence, a sort of dramatic pause.

Williams already has done major work on a White Sox team that surprised people even without the new additions. But when third baseman Brent Morel developed back issues and veteran Orlando Hudson wasn’t a fit at a position where he previously never had played, Williams went out and acquired Kevin Youkilis from Boston on June 24.

When he needed a veteran reliever to help his youthful bullpen, Williams picked up Brett Myers from Houston. And when the White Sox needed another quality, frontline starter to also help lessen the workload on young rotation members such as Chris Sale and Jose Quintana, Williams added Francisco Liriano Saturday night from the Twins. Utility infielder Eduardo Escobar appeared to be the only player given up in these three deals combined who still figured prominently in the White Sox future.

So, what’s left for Williams and the White Sox?

He still could add to the bench, with Rey Olmedo taking Escobar’s place as utility infielder and rookie Jordan Danks serving as the extra outfielder. Williams also could pursue another left-handed reliever to complete a veteran southpaw tandem with Matt Thornton.

Then again, where Williams and pushing toward the ultimate prize of winning a World Series is concerned, no trade, big or small, becomes unexpected at this time of year.

“You plot out a course and go down that course and try to take action,” Williams said. “If you lose out on one, turn the page and move on to the next.”

Scott Merkin

White Sox upgrade starting pitching, add Liriano

The White Sox moved to solidify their starting rotation shortly after Saturday night’s win over the Rangers, acquiring lefty Francisco Liriano from the Twins in exchange for infielder Eduardo Escobar and lefty Pedro Hernandez.

Liriano, 28, is only 3-10 with a 5.31 ERA this season but has pitched much better since returning May 30 from a stint in the bullpen. In 10 starts since then, he owns a 3.68 ERA, 79 strikeouts and 29 walks in 66 innings, despite a rough outing on Monday. Coincidentally, that came courtesy of the White Sox, who also fell victim to a Liriano no-hitter last May 3.

Escobar, 23, has spent the entire season on Chicago’s 25-man roster, appearing in 36 games at second base, third base and shortstop. He is hitting .207 with four doubles and a triple.

Hernandez, also 23, has posted a 2.94 ERA over 15 appearances, including 14 starts, between Double-A and Triple-A this season. He also made one start with the White Sox, giving up eight runs on 12 hits July 18 at Boston.

– Andrew Simon

Myers heading to White Sox

The Astros have acquired right-hander Matt Heidenreich, left-hander Blair Walters and a player to be named later from the Chicago White Sox in exchange for veteran Brett Myers.

Heidenreich (6-5, 185) was  9-4 with a 3.95 ERA in 18 combined starts at Winston-Salem (Class A) and Birmingham (Double-A) with two complete games and a shutout. He was a Carolina League mid-season All-Star and earned the league Pitcher of the Week award for the week of June 2nd. The 21-year-old, who was the White Sox fourth-round selection in the 2009 draft, has a 25-17 record in four Minor League seasons with a 3.87 ERA in 75 appearances (56 starts). He will be assigned to Corpus Christi (Double-A).

Walters, 22, was 4-6 with a 3.96 ERA in 18 combined starts with Kannapolis (Class A) and Winston-Salem (Class A) this season while tallying 93 strikeouts in 97 2.3innings with 22 walks. Walters, who was taken in the 11th round of the 2011 draft by the White Sox, has a 13-6 record in his two minor league seasons with a 3.99 ERA in 32 appearances (31 starts) with 165 punchouts in 171 1/3 innings of work. He will be assigned to Lancaster (A).

 “The pitchers we are receiving are talented, young prospects with big league upside,” Luhnow said. “They have had success in their young careers and we’re excited to add them to the mix.”

This season, the 31-year-old Myers was 0-4 with a 3.52 ERA in 35 relief appearances for Houston with 19 saves in 21 chances as he made the transition from starter to reliever.

“Brett showed that he was a real team player by going to the bullpen for us and was very successful as our closer,” Luhnow said. “We appreciate everything he has done for us.”

Quentin dealt to Padres for two hurlers

The White Sox and Padres pulled off a trade Saturday afternoon that sends outfielder Carlos Quentin to San Diego in exchange for two Minor League pitchers.

The White Sox will receive 23-year-old right-hander Simon Castro and 22-year-old lefty Pedro Hernandez from the Padres.

Quentin, 29, is a two-time All-Star who has hit at least 21 homers in each of the last four seasons with Chicago. He was drafted by the D-backs in the first round of the 2003 First-Year Player Draft and spent two seasons with Arizona.

His first year with the White Sox, in 2008, was his best so far, as he hit .288 with 100 RBIs and 36 homers. He has played either left or right field his entire career.

“Improving our offense is a priority this offseason,” Padres general manager Josh Byrnes said. “And the acquisition of Carlos gives us a proven middle-of-the-order bat. We specifically targeted Carlos because of his production and his hard-nosed style of play.”

Castro, the Padres’ Minor League Pitcher of the Year in 2009, split time between Double-A San Antonio and Triple-A Tucson in 2011, posting a 7-8 record with a 5.63 ERA and 94 strikeouts in 22 starts overall. He began the season with San Antonio, where he was 5-6, before moving up to Tucson, where he was 2-2 with a 10.17 ERA.

He has been in the Padres’ Minor League system for six seasons, and he was named to the Texas League mid- and postseason All-Star teams in 2010, while also pitching for the World Team in the All-Star Futures Game in Anaheim.

Hernandez spent time at Class A Lake Elsinore this season, along with Tucson and San Antonio, posting a 10-3 record with a 3.49 ERA in 28 games (18 starts) overall. He recorded 94 strikeouts in 116 innings of work.

The southpaw is 25-11 over five seasons in the San Diego Minor League system.

– Joey Nowak

Low-cost pitching options abound for Angels

The question is how long they’re willing to wait out the likes of C.J. Wilson and Ryan Madson. As The Los Angeles Times pointed out on Monday — Day 1 of the Winter Meetings — new general manager Jerry DiPoto plans to meet with Wilson’s agent here in Dallas. Frankly, why wouldn’t he? The real question is whether it’s possible — or even practical — for the Angels to fork over most of their remaining payroll on one arm, to address the best aspect of the team no less.

If they don’t want to go that route, or commit to Madson — remember, the Phillies reportedly offered four years at $44 million — there are a few low-cost options to be had.

Starting pitcher-wise, Mark Buehrle is the logical fit. Problem: A lot of teams want him, and he’s said to be looking for a no-trade clause as part of at least a three-year deal. Some other lefties to keep in mind: Jeff Francis (4.82 ERA in 31 starts for the Royals last year), Erik Bedard (3.62 ERA in 24 starts for the Red Sox and Mariners) and Paul Maholm (3.66 ERA in 26 starts for the Pirates).

As for the right-handed bullpen arms, there are plenty from which to choose. The most intriguing may be Octavio Dotel, because of how well he pitched down the stretch for the World Series-champion Cardinals and because of his experience as both a setup man and closer. Dotel (38) shifted from a Type A free agent to a Type B under the new CBA, so he won’t cost the team that signs him a Draft pick.

Some others: LaTroy Hawkins, Francisco Cordero, Takahashi Saito, Frank Francisco, Mike MacDougal, Scott Linebrink and Luis Ayala, among a host of others.

– Alden Gonzalez

Yankees keeping an eye on Danks

The Yankees have been linked to White Sox left-hander John Danks for some time, with little movement on the situation. Meanwhile, Brian Cashman has been talking about how he’s made his calls, but some teams seem to be asking for too much from New York’s farm system.

This could be an example. Jon Heyman tweets that the White Sox asked the Yankees for both catcher Jesus Montero and left-hander Manny Banuelos in exchange for the 26-year-old Danks. The Yankees weren’t interested at that price, but they will keep listening with regard to Danks, who was 8-12 with a 4.33 ERA in 27 starts this year for Chicago.

- Bryan Hoch

Girardi: Yankees’ rotation may be set

Yankees manager Joe Girardi tells the New York Daily News that he expects to go into the 2012 season with a rotation that includes CC Sabathia, Ivan Nova, Phil Hughes, Freddy Garcia and A.J. Burnett.

“I think we’ll look at maybe possibly adding some more depth to it, but I feel pretty good about these guys,” Girardi told the newspaper in a Tuesday telephone interview. “Our pitching was really overlooked last year, I thought. We threw the ball well all year long. Will we try to add one more veteran arm? It’s possible, but I feel pretty good about the guys we have in camp right now.”

Girardi does not seem to be expecting a big free agent along the lines of C.J. Wilson, Mark Buehrle or Edwin Jackson to be arriving in the Bronx.

“I think our club is starting to try to develop a little bit more,” Girardi said. “Sometimes you feel that you can overpay for pitching and it can cost you.”

The Daily News indicates the Yankees may be interested in trading for the Cubs’ Matt Garza, but are unwilling to move blue chip prospects like Jesus Montero or Manny Banuelos for him. The New York Post also notes that the Yankees could consider dealing Dellin Betances to the White Sox for John Danks.

- Bryan Hoch

11/16 Cubs consider pitching options

Could Mark Buehrle switch to the North Side of Chicago? According to FOX Sports, the Cubs have had multiple discussions with Buehrle’s agent, Jeff Berry. The other teams interested in the left-hander include the White Sox, Marlins, Blue Jays, Royals, Angels, Nationals and Diamondbacks. Buehrle is 24-6 in 40 games (39 starts) his career against National League teams with a 3.32 ERA. And, against the NL Central, he’s 13-4 with a 3.28 ERA. Last season, he won 13 games for the fourth straight year, going 13-9 with a 3.59 ERA.

The Cubs do need pitching — a lack of depth was a problem last year. SI.com’s Jon Heyman reports the Cubs and Royals are talking to Scott Boras about pitcher Bruce Chen. The 34-year-old has never had a multi-year deal in his career. The left-hander was 12-8 with a 3.77 ERA last season with the Royals, and has pitched for the Braves, Phillies, Mets, Expos, Reds, Astros, Red Sox, Orioles and Rangers besides the Royals.

– Carrie Muskat

Rasmus could be on White Sox radar

According to a report from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, trade talks between the White Sox and Cardinals centering on left-handed hitting outfielder Colby Rasmus have “accelerated” in recent days.

The report talked about right-handed starter Edwin Jackson, who will be a free agent after the 2011 season, or left-handed reliever Matt Thornton as potential St. Louis targets. Jackson could be moved without weakening the current rotation, as the White Sox are working with six quality starters, despite Philip Humber’s brief move to the bullpen.

Thornton agreed to a two-year, $12-million extension, with a 2014 club option, during Spring Training. The White Sox have three lefties in the bullpen, with Thornton, Chris Sale and Will Ohman, and were impressed with the work turned in by southpaw Hector Santiago during his short 2011 Major League stint. They already are loaded in the outfield, though, as shown by the lack of room to promote hot-hitting Dayan Viciedo from Triple-A Charlotte.

Adding a talent such as the 24-year-old Rasmus would not lessen the White Sox pursuit in a very winnable American League Central but also could help fortify their future base.

When asked for comment Sunday about the matter, general manager Ken Williams told MLB.com via e-mail he will be available to chat on Monday after Ozzie Guillen’s pregame press session. Jackson, who earned the win in Sunday’s 4-2 victory over the Indians, already had heard the rumor but took the trade rumblings in stride.

“My name is in trade rumors every year,” said Jackson, who has been traded four times. “It’s been like this for the last five years. It’s definitely nothing I worry about. I can’t control it. I just want to play wherever I’m wanted to play.”

The Cardinals know that even in a down year, Rasmus has significant value, and it’s difficult to envision them moving just to move him. His challenges in adjusting to the pressures of being the most hailed Cardinals prospect in ages are well-covered, but even so, he’s a young, high-ceiling, cost-controlled player at a premium position that has value.

Thus, while St. Louis is surely listening on Rasmus, actively shopping him is a separate question. And in any deal where Rasmus was moved, it’s hard to imagine the Cards wouldn’t get more than a rental starting pitcher. They would almost certainly need to get some kind of significant prospect or young, team-controlled player who could be a solution somewhere for a few years.

Still, Rasmus’ playing time has diminished as a result of his slump, and the Cardinals appear more and more comfortable with Jon Jay in center field. They also have Allen Craig on the mend from a knee injury, and though Craig is certainly not a center fielder, he would replenish the team’s outfield depth in the event of a move.

– Matthew Leach and Scott Merkin

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